SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.16 issue2Statute, ethnic identity and perceived variability in children author indexsubject indexarticles search
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Journal

Article

Indicators

Related links

  • Have no similar articlesSimilars in SciELO

Share


Psicologia

Print version ISSN 0874-2049

Abstract

GONCALVES, Alexandra Isabel de Sá  and  GARCIA-MARQUES, Teresa. Aversive racism: a question of individual and cultural beliefs dissociation?. Psicologia [online]. 2002, vol.16, n.2, pp.411-424. ISSN 0874-2049.  http://dx.doi.org/10.17575/rpsicol.v16i2.486.

Current approaches to prejudice and racism suggest that, though discriminatory behaviour is now socially deplored, it has not lessened. Even low prejudiced individuals can discriminate in a more indirect or subtle way (e.g. Gaetner & Dovidio, 1986; Dovidio & Gaertner, 1998; Devine, 1989). The assumption of two distinct knowledge structures can help us explain why this may happen. These knowledge structures correspond to our cultural beliefs (stereotypes) which are frequently and easily activated, and our individual beliefs, only activated in some circumstances (Devine, 1989). The discriminative or non-discriminative nature of subsequent judgments is a function of the activation of one or the other type of knowledge structure. This hypothesis was addressed in two different studies. One regarding criminal judgments (Study 1) and other regarding job related behaviours (Study 2). The differential activation of these knowledge structures was induced by the manipulation of processing goals. Thus participants were asked either to report their own beliefs or what "people in general think". As we expected, the activation of cultural beliefs lead to more discriminatory judgments than individual beliefs.

Keywords : Racismo aversivo; esterótipos; crenças individuais; crenças culturais.

        · abstract in Portuguese     · text in Portuguese     · Portuguese ( pdf )

 

Creative Commons License All the contents of this journal, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License